Canada Coronavirus Breaking NewsWorld Coronavirus Breaking News

COVID-19 Live Updates: News on coronavirus in Calgary for April 30 – Calgary Herald

With news on COVID-19 happening rapidly, we’ve created this page to bring you our latest stories and information on the outbreak in and around Calgary.


What’s happening now

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.


8:29 p.m.Calgary business owners hesitant about potential mid-May reopening
Supreme Men’s Hair Styling Barbershop in the SE is pictured during the COVID-19 pandemic in Calgary. Thursday, April 30, 2020. Brendan Miller/Postmedia
Alberta’s new COVID-19 relaunch plan means some select businesses could be allowed to reopen as early as May 14, but not all Calgary business owners are feeling comfortable with the idea of welcoming back customers two weeks from now.Hatem Kaddoura owns the Midlake Barber Shop & Supreme Men’s Hair Styling in southeast Calgary. He says he’s uncertain about reopening as the number of Calgarians infected with the novel coronavirus continues to steadily rise.Read more.8:20 p.m.

Alberta golf courses get green light to open this weekend

Alberta golfers will be hitting the links soon. The putting green at Blue Devil Golf Club is pictured following Premier Jason Kenney’s announcement to gradually open Alberta’s economy. Golf courses in Alberta will be allowed to open this weekend, following strict physical distancing measures, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thursday, April 30, 2020. Brendan Miller/Postmedia

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Albertans, dust off your golf clubs.

As part of a staged economic relaunch strategy, Premier Jason Kenney announced Thursday that courses across the province will be allowed to open — with safety restrictions — “as soon as this weekend.”

The divot-digging had been delayed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Clubhouses and pro shops will, for now, remain closed.

Read more.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.


7:49 p.m.

City braces for tough choices as Calgary faces steep budget shortfall in 2020

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi was the only member of council in council chambers on Monday, April 6, 2020. The rest of council took part from home amidst COVID-19 precautions. Gavin Young/Postmedia

Calgary is staring down a possible $235-million hole in the city’s coffers this year — and there are likely more funding shortfalls to come.

City council looked at several possibilities for their financial future Thursday, with a gap that gets wider the longer public-health restrictions last during the COVID-19 pandemic.

In the best-case scenario presented to council, if Calgary’s local state of emergency lasts two more months, the city faces a $145-million shortfall. If it goes until the end of the year, that number jumps to $235 million.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Read more.


7:21 p.m.

Former Edmonton Oiler Georges Laraque has COVID-19

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.


7 p.m.

Flood threats abate in Northern Alberta as Athabasca River ice jam shrinks

Flooded sections of Keyano College on Wednesday, April 29, 2020. Parts of downtown Fort McMurray began flooding on Sunday, April 26, 2020. Vincent McDermott/Fort McMurray Today/Postmedia Network
Flooded sections of Keyano College are seen on April 29, 2020. Parts of downtown Fort McMurray began flooding on Sunday, April 26, 2020. Vincent McDermott/Postmedia

The flood threat to Fort McMurray has been lowered as river levels recede and ice jams shrink, Environment Minister Jason Nixon said Thursday.

The Athabasca River ice jam is now about 13 kilometres long, down from 25 kilometres, and the river level has dropped 3.5 metres. The Clearwater River level has dropped about one metre. Nixon said officials expect ice runs to continue there for the next few days but that will not lead to additional flooding for Fort McMurray.

Read more.


6:35 p.m.

WestJet reaches agreement with pilot association to retain over 1,000 pilots

WestJet reached an agreement today with the Airline Pilot Association to save “more than 1,000 pilot jobs,” according to a news release.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

“We thank ALPA for the joint effort in working with us to assist our airline in remaining flexible and competitive,” WestJet chief operating officer Jeff Martin said in the release. “Our pilots will be a critical element of our recovery and retaining these important roles leaves us better positioned to recover strongly and return WestJet to a global airline.”

According to the release, WestJet and the pilot association agreed to amending “the terms to the current agreements”, which allowed WestJet to retain the pilots at WestJet, WestJet Encore, and Swoop.

“The agreement we have reached is due to the dedication of the WestJet executive and the WestJet pilots, in a time where everyone is making sacrifices to protect our airline,” ALPA MEC chair Dave Colquhoun said in the release. “ALPA’s elected leadership appreciates the time and effort that was involved in working together to minimize the impact to our members and we look forward to the time when all of our pilots, and many of the other WestJetters who are casualties of this crisis, are back to work at WestJet.”

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.


6:30 p.m.

Health officials insist Cargill plant safe to reopen despite union’s opposition

A near deserted Cargill plant near High River due to COVID-19 on April 23, 2020. Darren Makowichuk/Postmedia

Concerns remain about the decision to resume operations at the Cargill meat-packing plant where more than 900 employees have been infected by the COVID-19 virus.

The High River facility is set to reopen Monday following a two-week shutdown, operating at one shift as it resumes production. Cargill said in a statement Wednesday it had the support of Alberta Health Services and Occupational Health and Safety to reopen.

Read more.


6:05 p.m.

More Calgary festivals confirm 2020 cancellation

Calgary summer festivals Inglewood Sunfest, Mexifest, Fiestaval and Taste of Calgary confirmed that they won’t be held in 2020. The four festivals, all produced by the Urban Productions Group, announced they will be cancelling their 2020 dates in a news release Thursday.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

“We know this is tough news for our festival community to digest,” the release said. “We want you to know that this decision was not made easily and we are on your side. We are devastated for you, our community, our city, our nation, and our world.”

On April 24, the City of Calgary cancelled all public events until at least Aug. 31.


5:38 p.m.

‘Like Cargill’: Workers’ concerns over safety at local Amazon plant rise with more COVID-19 cases

The Amazon distribution centre in Balzac on Monday, April 13, 2020. Darren Makowichuk/Postmedia

Staff safety concerns at a Calgary-area Amazon plant are increasing along with the number of COVID-19 cases confirmed there.

After company officials reported a COVID-19 case among workers on April 12 at the fulfillment centre at Balzac, management has informed staff of four more infections, the latest alert issued on April 28.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Fearing the site could become a major breeding ground of infection similar to the Cargill meat processing plant at High River, some staff have repeated their insistence that the facility be shut down for more thorough cleaning and further safety measures to be taken.

“The concern is very much like Cargill … my fear is this will explode,” said one employee who wouldn’t give his name.

Read more.


5:23 p.m.

Alberta’s relaunch: Golf courses to open Monday; daycares, restaurants at 50% capacity, retail stores to reopen as early as May 14

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney shared the province’s plan for gradually reopening the economy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic Thursday afternoon.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

  • Vehicle access to provincial parks/public lands will open tomorrow
  • Boat launches in provincial park will start opening May 1-14
  • Golf courses can open as Monday; clubhouses and pro shops must stay closed until stage one. Kenney had said at the presser that they would be able to open as early as this weekend; the province later clarified that golf courses won’t be able to reopen until Monday at the earliest.
  • AHS will resume scheduled, non-urgent surgeries as soon as May 4; dental and healthcare workers can also resume services on May 4
  • Stage one, as early as May 14 if things stay stable, will allow retail businesses (clothing, furniture, bookstores, vendors at farmers markets), hair salons and barber shops, museums and art galleries, scheduled surgeries, dental procedures, physiotherapy, chiropractic, optometry, daycares and out-of-school care with limits on occupancy, summer camps, cafes and restaurants at 50 percent capacity will resume operations. Pubs and bars that allow minors inside will also be allowed to open at 50 percent capacity.
  • Stage two will allow additional businesses and services to reopen with two-metre physical distancing requirements including K-12 schools, personal services, summer camps, post-secondary institutions and movie theatres. More surgeries will be scheduled, as well.
  • Stage three will involve, with some restrictions, fully reopening all businesses; permitting larger gatherings, festivals, concerts and major sporting events; reopening nightclubs, gyms, pools, recreation centres and arenas; and no restrictions on non-essential travel.
  • Campsites could be available as soon as June 1; sites will be open to Albertans only
  • Kenney emphasized that Alberta will not be reopening K-12 schools for the balance of the academic year. “However, we are in discussion with school boards to allow limited reopening on a trial basis,” Kenney said, for specialized programs, summer schools, for example.
  • Kenney was asked specifically about the NHL being able to play games in Stage 2 without a crowd. “To date we have not received a specific proposal from the NHL,” Kenney said.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

You can watch it below.

[embedded content]

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.


5:23 p.m.

Latest on COVID-19 in Alberta: 190 new cases, three additional deaths

Alberta chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw provided an update on COVID-19 in the province after Premier Jason Kenney revealed the province’s relaunch strategy.

  • 190 new cases; there are 5,355 total cases in Alberta
  • Three additional deaths; 89 Albertans have died from the virus. A previous death was revised to not being COVID-19-related.
  • 2,161 recovered cases
  • 544 cases at continuing care facilities across the province
  • 908 total cases in workers at Cargill meat-packing plant near High River, 631 of which are now recovered
  • 333 confirmed cases in workers at JBS plant in Brooks

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.


5:12 p.m.

Time for Alberta doctors, health ministry to fix ‘broken’ relationship, Westlock mayor says as physicians plan to leave

Health Minister Tyler Shandro announces the temporary expansion of Calgary's Peter Lougheed Centre, creating 100 care spaces for patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, at a press conference in Edmonton Thursday April 9, 2020. Photo by David Bloom
Health Minister Tyler Shandro , shown here on April 9, 2020, rolled back some of the billing changes for rural physicians, including exempting them from the overhead changes last week. David Bloom/Postmedia

The mayor of Westlock says it’s time for all sides of the growing conflict between Alberta doctors and the health department to sit down and have an adult conversation.

The comments from Mayor Ralph Leriger come after 18 physicians in the town north of Edmonton signed a letter, made public Thursday, saying some of them will no longer work in hospitals after the COVID-19 pandemic because they no longer trust the government.

Read more.


5:08 p.m.

Calgary couple celebrate after creative virtual escape room proposal

Calgarian Chad Van Dyk had to get creative with his proposal to girlfriend Jenna Bell when his original plans were put on hold because of social distancing. With the help of a virtual escape room company, Van Dyk proposed to Bell alongside friends on a Zoom call when the team opened the vault at the end of the quest. Photo courtesy Live Video Escape Rooms

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Calgarian Chad Van Dyk had to get creative with his proposal to girlfriend Jenna Bell when his original plans were put on hold because of social distancing. With the help of a virtual escape room company, Van Dyk proposed to Bell alongside friends on a Zoom call when the team opened the vault at the end of the quest.

Read more.


5:03 p.m.

Jane’s Walk goes virtual this weekend due to COVID-19 precautions

A Jane’s Walk in Chinatown in 2018. Calgary Foundation

Jane’s Walk will proceed this weekend in Calgary despite physical distancing measures and precautions due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

But this year’s educational strolls will look much different.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

The annual global event of free neighbourhood walking tours is going virtual, turning Jane’s Walk into an online experience that participants can watch from their homes as they try to harness the spark of urbanist and activist Jane Jacobs.

Read more.


5:02 p.m.

High River to celebrate health care heroes with special initiative

Dr Amelia Leskiw takes COVID-19 samples at a drive thru location in High River, AB, south of Calgary on Friday, April 17, 2020. Jim Wells/Postmedia

A special celebration for health-care workers in High River is taking place Friday as the town tackles a large outbreak of COVID-19 at the nearby Cargill meat-packing plant and cases in long-term care facilities.

The High River District Health Care Foundation, along with the Town of High River, has declared Friday as High River Health Care Heroes Day to acknowledge the dedication of their front-line workers, including home care employees, cleaning staff, lab techs, nurses and physicians.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Read more.


2:58 p.m.

B.C. RCMP seize 1,500 unauthorized COVID-19 test kits

B.C. RCMP seized more than 1,500 unauthorized test kits from a person in Richmond, according to a news release.

The Richmond resident had acquired them and was selling them online “without authorization,” B.C. RCMP said in the release.

Tests have to be authorized by Health Canada to be imported or sold in Canada, the release said, adding it is illegal to sell or advertise “health products that make false or misleading claims to prevent, diagnose, treat or cure COVID-19.”

“Canadians who have purchased unauthorized health products should stop using them immediately and consult a health care professional if they have used any of these products and have health concerns,” the release said.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.


2:08 p.m.

Braid: Poll shows Dr. Deena Hinshaw’s a smash hit, while government popularity lags

Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, appears at a daily update on COVID-19 with Premier Jason Kenney on March 15, 2020. Shaughn Butts/Postmedia

Two months ago, few people could have named the province’s chief medical officer of health.

Today, Dr. Deena Hinshaw is one of the best-known and most revered figures in Alberta.

A new poll from Marc Henry’s ThinkHQ shows fully 88 per cent of Albertans approve her handling of COVID-19.

Henry calls her popularity “astounding.” Just as amazing, only eight per cent of respondents offer any criticism at all of Hinshaw.

Read more.


1:30 p.m.

Laptop drive for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Calgary

A person works on a laptop in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017 file photo. An annual review of how well the government interacts with Canadians applying or managing federal benefits suggests more people would turn to online channels, but only if there was a human around to help them out. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Elise Amendola
NBi Solutions is accepting laptops on behalf of Big Brothers Big Sisters Canada to be donated to kids in need. Elise Amendola/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Calgary is collecting laptops for children in need during the COVID-19 crisis.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

With education shifting online, the organization wants to ensure that every child has the technology they need to connect with their classmates.

NBi Solutions will be hosting a laptop and tablet drive in the company’s parking lot at 3608, 8 Street S.E. on Saturday, from 8 a.m. to noon.

Laptops must be no more than 5 years old. Organizers are also asking people donating Apple products to disable the “Find my iPhone” activation lock before dropping off the device.

More details can be found at http://nbi.solutions.


12:30 p.m.

Player agents, executives call for NBA to cancel season: report

FILE PHOTO: An NBA logo is seen on the facade of its flagship store at the Wangfujing shopping street in Beijing, China October 8, 2019. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang/File Photo ORG XMIT: FW1
FILE PHOTO: An NBA logo is seen on the facade of its flagship store at the Wangfujing shopping street in Beijing, China October 8, 2019. Tingshu Wang/REUTERS

National Basketball Association executives and player agents are calling on the league to cancel the remainder of the 2019-20 season due to health concerns over the novel coronavirus outbreak, CNBC reported on Thursday.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Even as many states in the U.S. begin to ease stay-at-home restrictions and open up the economy, cracks are beginning to show in the NBA’s resolve to complete the campaign and crown a champion, according to CNBC.

Talking to executives and agents, CNBC said team owners are concerned with liability issues and are conflicted about whether or not to give up on the current season.

Read more.


11:15 a.m.

By the Numbers: Alberta cases of COVID-19 by age group


11:00 a.m.

Calgary releases updated financial forecast to reflect impact of COVID-19

Calgary city councillors are meeting virtually today to hear details on the city’s current financial state from city CFO Carla Male.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Postmedia Reporter Madeline Smith is live tweeting from the meeting. you can follow her online at @meksmith.

The projected revenue gap could range from $145 million to $235 million, depending on how long the economy remains shuttered.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.


10:40 a.m.

Calgary asks citizens to do #3Things4Neighbours

Pictured is a kind message left behind a window in the community of Westmount on Tuesday, April 28, 2020. Azin Ghaffari/Postmedia

A hashtag started by a Calgary business owner is picking up steam in the city.

Usman Tahir asked his social media followers to commit three simple acts of kindness and used the hashtag #3Things4Neighbours.

“Albertans are no strangers to crisis,” said Usman in a city release. “As we saw in Fort McMurray during the devastating wildfires and in Calgary during the awful floods, the communities banded together and people were empowered through simple acts of kindness to come together and help each other. I wanted to encourage Calgarians to do the same in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Suggestions of things to do include reaching out to seniors or other vulnerable neighbours and asking if there’s any way you can help, checking in with neighbours before you go to the grocery store to see if they need anything, or checking in with old friends.


10:25 a.m.

AstraZeneca CEO says now is the time for taking COVID vaccine risk

Small bottles labelled with a “Vaccine COVID-19” sticker and a medical syringe are seen in this illustration taken taken April 10, 2020. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration

The head of British pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca said now was the time to take risks by betting on a COVID-19 vaccine and he should know by June or July whether one from its University of Oxford partner will be effective or not.

AstraZeneca said earlier on Thursday it would make and distribute globally the Oxford University’s vaccine, an announcement that comes before trials prove whether the shot is effective.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

“It is definitely a risk to launch into the development of the vaccine but now is the time to take those kind of risks,” CEO Pascal Soriot told BBC radio on Thursday.

Read more.


9:50 a.m.

Ireland to consider easing restrictions every 2-4 weeks, PM says

Ireland’s Prime Minister Taoiseach Leo Varadkar speaks during a news conference on the ongoing situation with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at Government Buildings in Dublin, Ireland March 24, 2020. Steve Humphreys/Pool via REUTERS

Ireland’s roadmap for gradually easing coronavirus restrictions will lay out how any changes will be made every two to four weeks, but the government will intervene earlier if things go off track, Acting Prime Minister Leo Varadkar said.

Varadkar listed five criteria to be considered each time a change is considered: the progress of the disease, healthcare capacity and resilience, testing and contact tracing capacity, the ability to shield at-risk groups, and the risk of secondary morbidity and mortality due to the restrictions themselves.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Read more.


9:25 a.m.

Canada’s early COVID-19 cases came from the U.S. not China, provincial data shows

U.S. Customs officers speak with people in a car beside a sign saying that the U.S. border is closed at the US/Canada border in Lansdowne, Ontario. Canada’s GDP plunged 9 per cent in March due to travel restrictions and temporary business closures to fight the coronavirus pandemic, said Statistics Canada. Lars Hagberg/AFP via Getty Images

The global COVID-19 pandemic began in Wuhan, China, but data from Canada’s largest provinces show it was American travellers, not Chinese, who brought the deadly virus to our shores.

Despite this evidence, the federal government brought in travel restrictions on China first and American border restrictions were the last to be put in place.

Read more.


9:15 a.m.

Trudeau uses daily briefing to provide information on CAF helicopter crash

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will give his daily briefing at 9:15 a.m. He will be joined by Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan and other military officials.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

  • Trudeau said six members of the Canadian military went down on a Royal Canadian Military helicopter that crashed in the Ionian Sea.
  • One body has been recovered and the five others are missing.
  • Trudeau says all six members were heroes, and that the loss is especially hard for Nova Scotia.
  • Flight data and voice recorders have been recovered.

Tune in below:

[embedded content]

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.


8:55 a.m.

Nunavut confirms first case of COVID-19 in Pond Inlet

The remote community of Pond Inlet, Nunavut, has its first case. supplied/Reuters

Nunavut says it has its first case of COVID-19.

The territory’s chief public health officer, Dr. Michael Patterson, says the case was detected in the community of Pond Inlet.

“We did anticipate that it was only a matter of time before our territory had a confirmed case, and unfortunately, today is that day,” Patterson said in a news release Thursday.

The person was said to be in isolation and doing well.

Read more.


8:35 a.m.

Federal deficit could top $252 billion due to pandemic

Parliament Hill in Ottawa on April 22, 2020. Jean Levac/Postmedia

Parliament’s budget watchdog says that it’s likely the federal deficit for the year will hit $252.1 billion as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

The figure is an estimate based on the almost $146 billion in spending measures the government has announced to help cushion the economic blow from the pandemic, estimated declines in the country’s gross domestic product, and the price of oil remaining well below previous expectations.

Parliamentary budget officer Yves Giroux’s report assumes real GDP will contract by 12 per cent this year, and help shoot the federal debt-to-GDP ratio to 48.4 per cent.

The report out this morning says the debt ratio could keep rising if some of the emergency aid measures are extended or made permanent.

– The Canadian Press

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.


8:20 a.m.

Spain’s coronavirus daily death toll falls to lowest tally in nearly six weeks

SEVILLE, SPAIN - APRIL 26: A boy rides a bicycle as Spain eases lockdown rules for children on April 26, 2020 in Seville, Spain. Children in Spain, which has had one of the stricter lockdowns in Europe, are now allowed to leave their homes for up to an hour per day. The country has had more than 220,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and over 20,000 reported deaths, although the rate has declined after weeks of quarantine measures. (Photo by Marcelo del Pozo/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***
A boy rides a bicycle as Spain eases lockdown rules for children on April 26, 2020 in Seville, Spain. Children in Spain, which has had one of the stricter lockdowns in Europe, are now allowed to leave their homes for up to an hour per day. Marcelo del Pozo/Getty Images

The number of fatalities related to the novel coronavirus recorded overnight in Spain fell to 268, the lowest tally in nearly six weeks, the country’s health ministry said on Thursday.

The overall death toll rose to 24,543 on Thursday up from 24,275 on the previous day, the ministry said. The number of cases registered in the country rose to 213,435 from 212,917 the day before.

– Reuters


8:00 a.m.

Experts say child care needed in reopening plans

Hairstylist Kelly Knowles poses with her son Hndrxx Hamilton at her home in Regina on Wed Apr. 29, 2020. Kelly Knowles has many questions about returning to work, including where her son would go. The Regina hairstylist contacted his daycare after the Saskatchewan government announced last week that some businesses such as salons, shut down because of COVID-19, could reopen in mid-May. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell
Hairstylist Kelly Knowles poses with her son Hndrxx Hamilton at her home in Regina on Wed Apr. 29, 2020. Kelly Knowles has many questions about returning to work, including where her son would go. The Regina hairstylist contacted his daycare after the Saskatchewan government announced last week that some businesses such as salons, shut down because of COVID-19, could reopen in mid-May. Michael Bell/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Questions about child care and schools are being raised as various provinces outline their plans to relax public health restrictions so that some services and businesses can reopen and residents can go back to work.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

“For families with kids, they can’t participate in that if they don’t have child care,” says Jennifer Robson, associate professor in political management at Carleton University in Ottawa.

Read more.


7:40 a.m.

The true price of Canada’s wage subsidy and CERB to be released today

The costs of the CERB and a 75 per cent wage subsidy to the Government of Canada should be released today. Getty Images

Canadians will get an update today on two of the costliest emergency aid programs the federal government has initiated to help them weather the COVID-19 crisis.

The parliamentary budget officer is scheduled to post a costing note on the 75 per cent wage subsidy — a program the government expects to cost $73 billion and which it has called the largest economic policy in Canada since the Second World War.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Yves Giroux is also expected to post a costing note on the Canada Emergency Response Benefit, which is providing $2,000 a month for four months to Canadians forced out of work due to the pandemic.

Read more.


7:30 a.m.

Corbella: With record COVID-19 outbreak, Cargill’s safety measures in question

Cargill meats has shut down due to COVID-19 near High River on Tuesday, April 21, 2020. Darren Makowichuk/Postmedia ORG XMIT: POS2004211637519249
Cargill meats has shut down due to COVID-19 near High River on Tuesday, April 21, 2020. Darren Makowichuk/Postmedia

Postmedia columnist Licia Corbella writes: “There are some milestones you don’t want to set — records you don’t want to break.

“Alberta now has the dubious distinction of having the largest workplace COVID-19 outbreak in North America, stemming from the Cargill meat-packing plant in High River, says Thomas Hesse, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union Local 401.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

“With 821 confirmed cases of employee infections and one death at the Cargill plant, and 276 cases and one death at the JBS plant in Brooks, fully 21 per cent of Alberta’s 5,165 total cases come from those two workplaces.”

Read more.


Wednesday

Calgary homicide reignites conversation on anticipated surge in domestic violence

Police hold the scene of a suspicious death in a home in the 600 block of Marian Crescent N.E. in Calgary on Tuesday, April 28, 2020.Gavin Young/Postmedia

Calgary’s latest domestic homicide that left a 24-year-old woman dead has renewed conversation about an anticipated surge in domestic violence as the COVID-19 pandemic drags on.

Brittney Ann Meszaros was found dead on Monday in a northwest residence she shared with her partner. A 23-year-old man, who police said was in a common-law relationship with Meszaros, has been charged with manslaughter.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Police said the couple has no known history of domestic violence but believe the incident is domestic in nature.

Read more.


Wednesday

Alberta reports seven more deaths at seniors homes

Seven more residents of long-term care homes in Calgary infected by COVID-19 have died, including six at a southeast facility over the past week, chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said Wednesday.

That brings Alberta’s fatality toll up to 87 amid the pandemic. The province also recorded 315 new cases of the coronavirus, for a total of 5,165 since the outbreak began, Hinshaw said in her daily update.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Outbreaks at Alberta’s continuing care sites remain a concern, according to Hinshaw, who reported six deaths at Clifton Manor in southeast Calgary over the past week.

Read more.


Wednesday

Blood Tribe confirms first COVID-19 case

The Blood Tribe has its first case of COVID-19, the First Nation said in a press release Wednesday.

The Blood Tribe Department of Health confirmed there was one case on the reserve.

“Health officials are working quickly to notify those who have come into contact with this person,” the release said. “We offer our prayers for them and their family.”

The Blood Tribe is asking all residents and members to stay home or where they are as health officials complete contact tracing.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Blood Tribe members experiencing COVID-19 symptoms — fever, cough, sore throat, runny nose, nasal congestion, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing — are asked to call 403-737-8411.


Wednesday

315 new cases, seven deaths at Calgary long-term care centres

The latest on COVID-19 in Alberta from chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw

  • 5,205 tests in last 24 hours
  • 315 new cases; 5,165 total cases
  • 1,953 recovered cases
  • Seven additional deaths; 87 Albertans have died from the virus
  • All seven deaths were residents of long-term care centres in Calgary; six of them were from Clifton Manor
  • 503 cases in continuing care facilities across province
  • 821 cases in workers at Cargill meat-packing plant in High River
  • 276 cases at JBS plant in Brooks
  • 83 confirmed cases at Kearl Lake oilsands work camp; 65 in Alberta, 33 are on site.
  • Hinshaw announced new directives for long-term care facilities: those with mild symptoms (hoarse voice, sore muscles) must be tested immediately and isolated; if a case is identified, everyone else in the ward must also be tested. Staff members also must wear eye protection and other personal protective equipment.
  • She also said that residents of long term care centres can enjoy outdoor visits with one designated visitor and one other person. Everyone must still exercise physical distancing, Hinshaw said, and visitors must wear a mask.
  • Hinshaw said the definition of end of life is “two weeks prior to death;” up to two visitors at a time will be allowed to visit patient who is dying as long as physical distancing is maintained. No visitor restrictions are applicable to hospice settings, Hinshaw said.

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Watch the full update below.

[embedded content]

Story continues below

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.


Wednesday

Cargill plant to reopen May 4

The Cargill meat packing plant near High River, which closed due to a COVID-19 outbreak. Darren Makowichuk/Postmedia

The High River meat-packing plant at the centre of the province’s largest COVID-19 outbreak will reopen May 4 after a temporary shutdown.

The Cargill meat processing plant will operate at one shift as it resumes operations, the company said in a news release on Wednesday.

The decision to reopen was made with support from Alberta Health Services and Alberta Occupational Health and Safety, according to the company.

“All employees who are eligible to return to work in our harvest department are asked to report to work,” it stated.

Read more.

Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button
Close